sexta-feira, 26 de maio de 2017

Where My Books Go - William Butler Yeats

       









Where My Books Go - William Butler Yeats

ALL the words that I utter,
  And all the words that I write,
Must spread out their wings untiring,
  And never rest in their flight,
Till they come where your sad, sad heart is,        
  And sing to you in the night,
Beyond where the waters are moving,
  Storm-darken'd or starry bright.








A Valentine - Lewis Carroll

Sent to a friend who had complained that I was glad enough to see
him when he came, but didn't seem to miss him if he stayed away.

And cannot pleasures, while they last,
Be actual unless, when past,
They leave us shuddering and aghast,
With anguish smarting?
And cannot friends be firm and fast,
And yet bear parting?

And must I then, at Friendship's call,
Calmly resign the little all
(Trifling, I grant, it is and small)
I have of gladness,
And lend my being to the thrall
Of gloom and sadness?

And think you that I should be dumb,
And full DOLORUM OMNIUM,
Excepting when YOU choose to come
And share my dinner?
At other times be sour and glum
And daily thinner?

Must he then only live to weep,
Who'd prove his friendship true and deep
By day a lonely shadow creep,
At night-time languish,
Oft raising in his broken sleep
The moan of anguish?

The lover, if for certain days
His fair one be denied his gaze,
Sinks not in grief and wild amaze,
But, wiser wooer,
He spends the time in writing lays,
And posts them to her.

And if the verse flow free and fast,
Till even the poet is aghast,
A touching Valentine at last
The post shall carry,
When thirteen days are gone and past
Of February.

Farewell, dear friend, and when we meet,
In desert waste or crowded street,
Perhaps before this week shall fleet,
Perhaps to-morrow.
I trust to find YOUR heart the seat
Of wasting sorrow.












Upon Julia's Clothes - Robert Herrick

Whenas in silks my Julia goes,
Then, then (methinks) how sweetly flows
That liquefaction of her clothes.

Next, when I cast mine eyes, and see
That brave vibration each way free,
O how that glittering taketh me!














Sonnet 5 - Edna St. Vincent Millay



IF I should learn, in some quite casual way,
    That you were gone, not to return again—
Read from the back-page of a paper, say,
    Held by a neighbor in a subway train,
How at the corner of this avenue      
    And such a street (so are the papers filled)
A hurrying man—who happened to be you—
    At noon to-day had happened to be killed,
I should not cry aloud—I could not cry
    Aloud, or wring my hands in such a place—      
I should but watch the station lights rush by
    With a more careful interest on my face,
Or raise my eyes and read with greater care
Where to store furs and how to treat the hair.





I
Love, though for this you riddle me with darts,
And drag me at your chariot till I die, —
Oh, heavy prince! Oh, panderer of hearts! —
Yet hear me tell how in their throats they lie
Who shout you mighty: thick about my hair,
Day in, day out, your ominous arrows purr,
Who still am free, unto no querulous care
A fool, and in no temple worshiper!
I, that have bared me to your quiver's fire,
Lifted my face into its puny rain,
Do wreathe you Impotent to Evoke Desire
As you are Powerless to Elicit Pain!
(Now will the god, for blasphemy so brave,
Punish me, surely, with the shaft I crave!)

II
I think I should have loved you presently,
And given in earnest words I flung in jest;
And lifted honest eyes for you to see,
And caught your hand against my cheek and breast;
And all my pretty follies flung aside
That won you to me, and beneath your gaze,
Naked of reticence and shorn of pride,
Spread like a chart my little wicked ways.
I, that had been to you, had you remained,
But one more waking from a recurrent dream,
Cherish no less the certain stakes I gained,
And walk your memory's halls, austere, supreme,
A ghost in marble of a girl you knew
Who would have loved you in a day or two.

III
Oh, think not I am faithful to a vow!
Faithless am I save to love's self alone.
Were you not lovely I would leave you now:
After the feet of beauty fly my own.
Were you not still my hunger's rarest food,
And water ever to my wildest thirst,
I would desert you — think not but I would! —
And seek another as I sought you first.
But you are mobile as the veering air,
And all your charms more changeful than the tide,
Wherefore to be inconstant is no care:
I have but to continue at your side.
So wanton, light and false, my love, are you,
I am most faithless when I most am true.

IV
I shall forget you presently, my dear,
So make the most of this, your little day,
Your little month, your little half a year,
Ere I forget, or die, or move away,
And we are done forever; by and by
I shall forget you, as I said, but now,
If you entreat me with your loveliest lie
I will protest you with my favorite vow.
I would indeed that love were longer-lived,
And vows were not so brittle as they are,
But so it is, and nature has contrived
To struggle on without a break thus far, —
Whether or not we find what we are seeking
Is idle, biologically speaking.



To His Coy Mistress Andrew Marvell







Sonnet 023 - William Shakespeare

As an unperfect actor on the stage,
Who with his fear is put besides his part,
Or some fierce thing replete with too much rage,
Whose strength's abundance weakens his own heart;
So I, for fear of trust, forget to say
The perfect ceremony of love's rite,
And in mine own love's strength seem to decay,
O'ercharg'd with burden of mine own love's might.
O let my books be then the eloquence
And dumb presagers of my speaking breast,
Who plead for love and look for recompense
More than that tongue that more hath more express'd.
   O, learn to read what silent love hath writ:
   To hear with eyes belongs to love's fine wit.












Song - Sweetest love, I do not go - John Donne


Sweetest love, I do not go,
         For weariness of thee,
Nor in hope the world can show
         A fitter love for me;
                But since that I
Must die at last, 'tis best
To use myself in jest
         Thus by feign'd deaths to die.

Yesternight the sun went hence,
         And yet is here today;
He hath no desire nor sense,
         Nor half so short a way:
                Then fear not me,
But believe that I shall make
Speedier journeys, since I take
         More wings and spurs than he.

O how feeble is man's power,
         That if good fortune fall,
Cannot add another hour,
         Nor a lost hour recall!
                But come bad chance,
And we join to'it our strength,
And we teach it art and length,
         Itself o'er us to'advance.

When thou sigh'st, thou sigh'st not wind,
         But sigh'st my soul away;
When thou weep'st, unkindly kind,
         My life's blood doth decay.
                It cannot be
That thou lov'st me, as thou say'st,
If in thine my life thou waste,
         That art the best of me.

Let not thy divining heart
         Forethink me any ill;
Destiny may take thy part,
         And may thy fears fulfil;
                But think that we
Are but turn'd aside to sleep;
They who one another keep
         Alive, ne'er parted be.





Song - John Donne

Go and catch a falling star,
    Get with child a mandrake root,
Tell me where all past years are,
    Or who cleft the devil's foot,
Teach me to hear mermaids singing,
Or to keep off envy's stinging,
            And find
            What wind
Serves to advance an honest mind.

If thou be'st born to strange sights,
    Things invisible to see,
Ride ten thousand days and nights,
    Till age snow white hairs on thee,
Thou, when thou return'st, wilt tell me,
All strange wonders that befell thee,
            And swear,
            No where
Lives a woman true, and fair.

If thou find'st one, let me know,
    Such a pilgrimage were sweet;
Yet do not, I would not go,
    Though at next door we might meet;
Though she were true, when you met her,
And last, till you write your letter,
            Yet she
            Will be
False, ere I come, to two, or three.












The New Colossus - Emma Lazarus

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”


The New Colossus - Emma Lazarus  - Tradução em Português

Não como o gigante descarado da fama grega,
Com os membros conquistadores montados de terra em terra;
Aqui no nosso mar-lavado, portões do pôr do sol devem estar
Uma mulher poderosa com uma tocha, cuja chama
É o relâmpago aprisionado, e seu nome
Mãe dos Exilados. Da sua baliza
Brilha em todo o mundo bem-vindo; Seus olhos suaves mandam
O porto de ar-ponte que cidades gêmeas quadro.
"Mantenha-se, terras antigas, sua pompa estratificada!", Grita ela
Com lábios silenciosos. "Dê-me seu cansado, seu pobre,
Suas massas amontoadas ansiando para respirar livre,
O miserável refugo da sua terra cheia.
Mande estes, os desabrigados, tempest-tost a mim,
Levanto minha lâmpada ao lado da porta dourada!



The New Colossus - Emma Lazarus  - La traducción en español

No como el descarado gigante de la fama griega,
Con los miembros conquistadores a horcajadas de tierra en tierra;
Aquí, en nuestro mar-lavado, las puertas de la puesta del sol se pondrán de pie
Una mujer poderosa con una antorcha, cuya llama
Es el relámpago encarcelado, y su nombre
Madre de los Exiliados. De su mano de baliza
Brilla en todo el mundo la bienvenida; Sus ojos suaves mandan
El puerto de puente aéreo que marco ciudades gemelas.
"¡Guarda, tierras antiguas, tu pompa estratificada!"
Con labios silenciosos. "Dame tu cansado, tu pobre,
Sus masas apiñadas anhelando respirar libremente,
La desdichada basura de tu orilla llena de agua.
Envía a estos, los desamparados, a la tempestad-tost a mí,
¡Levanto mi lámpara junto a la puerta de oro!







New Year’s Eve - Midnight Frederika Richardson Macdonald
The Road Not Taken Robert Frost







The Flea - John Donne

Mark but this flea, and mark in this,  
How little that which thou deniest me is;  
It sucked me first, and now sucks thee,
And in this flea our two bloods mingled be;  
Thou know’st that this cannot be said
A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead,
    Yet this enjoys before it woo,
    And pampered swells with one blood made of two,
    And this, alas, is more than we would do.

Oh stay, three lives in one flea spare,
Where we almost, nay more than married are.  
This flea is you and I, and this
Our mariage bed, and marriage temple is;  
Though parents grudge, and you, w'are met,  
And cloistered in these living walls of jet.
    Though use make you apt to kill me,
    Let not to that, self-murder added be,
    And sacrilege, three sins in killing three.

Cruel and sudden, hast thou since
Purpled thy nail, in blood of innocence?  
Wherein could this flea guilty be,
Except in that drop which it sucked from thee?  
Yet thou triumph’st, and say'st that thou  
Find’st not thy self, nor me the weaker now;
    ’Tis true; then learn how false, fears be:
    Just so much honor, when thou yield’st to me,
    Will waste, as this flea’s death took life from thee.






If Rudyard Kipling







The Compleint of Chaucer to His Empty Purse - Geoffrey Chaucer

To yow, my purse, and to noon other wight
Complaine I, for ye be my lady dere.
I am so sory now that ye be light,
For certes but if ye make me hevy chere,
Me were as leef be leyd upon my bere,
For which unto your mercy thus I crye
Beth hevy ageyn or elles mot I dye.

Now voucheth-sauf this day er it be night
That I of yow the blisful soun may here,
Or see your colour lyke the sonne bright
That of yelownesse hadde never pere.
Ye be my lyf, ye be myn hertes stere,
Quene of comfort and of good companye,
Beth hevy ageyn or elles mot I dye.

Now purse that been to me my lyves lyght
And saveour as doun in this worlde here
Out of this toune help me thurgh your might
Sin that ye wole nat been my tresorere
For I am shave as nye as any frere;
But yet I prey unto your curtesye,
Beth hevy ageyn or elles mot I dye.

Lenvoy de Chaucer

O conquerour of Brutes Albyoun
Which that by line and free eleccioun
Been verray king, this song to yow I sende,
And ye that mowen alle oure harmes amende
Have minde upon my supplicacioun.







The Crow John Burroughs
The Darkling Thrush Thomas Hardy



Agatha Alfred Austin
Before the Birth of One of Her Children Anne Bradstreet
Catawba Wine Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Charge of the Light Brigade Alfred, Lord Tennyson
The Collar George Herbert







Short Poetry Collection 020






Conteúdo completo disponível em:






Links:


There's Nothing Holdin' Me Back - Shawn Mendes

Unforgettable - French Montana Featuring Swae Lee

DNA. - Kendrick Lamar

I'm The One - DJ Khaled Featuring Justin Bieber, Quavo, Chance The Rapper & Lil Wayne

Body Like A Back Road - Sam Hunt

Malibu - Miley Cyrus

Bacias hidrográficas do estado de São Paulo

Bacias hidrográficas - São Paulo - Conheça seu Estado (História e Geografia)

Prédios mais altos do mundo

Assalto - Carlos Drummond de Andrade

Santa Catarina - Conheça seu Estado (História e Geografia)

O espaço geográfico e sua organização

A organização do espaço geográfico brasileiro

Grandes Esperanças - Charles Dickens - PDF

O Alienista PDF

Just Go #JustGo - Viagem Volta ao Mundo

Boa Vista - Roraima RR - Brasil

Aldeia Tuyuka - Manaus - Amazonas AM - Brasil

Planta - Atividades Educativas para crianças

Idade das Religões - Religião História

Mato Grosso do Sul - Conheça seu Estado (História e Geografia)

Atividades extrativistas do Mato Grosso do Sul

Quincas Borba

Dom Casmurro

Esaú e Jacó

Salmos

Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas

Sanderlei Silveira

Sanderlei Silveira

Sanderlei Silveira

Sanderlei Silveira

Lista de BLOGs by Sanderlei Silveira



The Twilight Turns from Amethyst - James Joyce

Lil Wayne, Wiz Khalifa & Imagine Dragons With Logic, Ty Dolla $ign & X Ambassadors - Sucker For Pain

The Cold Heaven - William Butler Yeats

As festas populares em Santa Catarina SC

Áreas de preservação no estado de São Paulo SP

Os símbolos do estado do Rio de Janeiro RJ

A Guerra do Contestado PR

Pantanal – Patrimônio Natural da Humanidade MS

Assalto - Carlos Drummond de Andrade

Amor é fogo que arde sem se ver - Poesia

O navio negreiro - Poesia

Mitologia Grega

Antífona - Poema, Poesia

OPEP seguiu cumprindo acordo de redução de oferta de petróleo

Ursa Maior - Macunaíma - Mário de Andrade

Salmos - Capítulo 22 - Bíblia Online

Mercado Municipal Adolpho Lisboa - Manaus - Amazonas AM - Brasil

Mein Kampf PDF

Romeo and Juliet - William Shakespeare - AudioBook

Budismo moderno

The Second Coming - William Butler Yeats

The Road Not Taken - Robert Frost

Ozymandias - Percy Bysshe Shelley

Curso de Espanhol Online - Gratis e Completo

Curso de Inglês - Gratis e Completo

Crônica dos burros - Machado de Assis

Religion - Ancient History

Lição de Botânica - Teatro - Machado de Assis

A Conselho do Marido - Contos - Artur de Azevedo

A História do Cachorro dos Mortos - Leandro Gomes de Barros

Flor da Mocidade - Poesia - Machado de Assis

Contos de Eça de Queirós

Diva - José de Alencar - Audiobook

Educação Infantil - Nível 1 (crianças entre 4 a 6 anos)

Educação Infantil - Nível 2 (crianças entre 5 a 7 anos)

Educação Infantil - Nível 3 (crianças entre 6 a 8 anos)

Educação Infantil - Nível 4 (crianças entre 7 a 9 anos)

Educação Infantil - Nível 5 (crianças entre 8 a 10 anos)

Educação Infantil - Nível 6 (crianças entre 9 a 11 anos)

Euclides da Cunha - Os Sertões (Áudio Livro)

Historia en 1 Minuto

Lima Barreto - Contos (Áudio Livro - Audiobook)

Livros em PDF para Download (Domínio Público) - Sanderlei

A Mão e a Luva - Machado de Assis

Crônica - Machado de Assis

Dom Casmurro - Machado de Assis

Esaú e Jacó - Machado de Assis

Helena - Machado de Assis

Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas - Machado de Assis

Papéis Avulsos - Machado de Assis

Quincas Borba - Machado de Assis

O Diário de Anne Frank


Um comentário:

  1. ALL the words that I utter,
    And all the words that I write,
    Must spread out their wings untiring,
    And never rest in their flight,
    Till they come where your sad, sad heart is,
    And sing to you in the night,
    Beyond where the waters are moving,
    Storm-darken'd or starry bright.

    ResponderExcluir